Security and Ethics 3

Description

Part 1: Devil’s Canyon Policies, Plans, and Risks
Review the Devil’s Canyon Transcript.
In this scenario, you will evaluate how to design an enterprise architecture for a Mountain Resort. Your job is to utilize the team’s vision to design the enterprise architecture using the interactive map tools while staying within budget. 
Now that you’ve seen all of the elements contributing to the Devil’s Canyon enterprise architecture, Justin wants to move forward with developing privacy policies to ensure videos aren’t distributed or uploaded to the net without the consent of the people in them. This opens a much larger conversation: Devil’s Canyon is also in need of a complete security plan, as well as risk assessments. 
In a rationale and table, prepare the following information to present to the Devil’s Canyon team: 

Explain the relationship between policies and security plans. Identify potential policy needs, noting Justin’s privacy policy, in relation to the Devil’s Canyon enterprise structure. 
Outline the importance of a security plan in relation to security roles and safeguards. 
Analyze at least 5 security-related risks/threats that Devil’s Canyon may face.  
Assess the probability and impact to the Devil’s Canyon if each risk occurs. Based on these two factors, determine the overall risk level. For purposes of this assignment, evaluate and categorize each factor as low, medium, or high, and create a table to illustrate the risks. For example, a risk/threat with a low likelihood of occurrence and a high impact would represent an overall medium risk. 
Consider digital elements mentioned in the designing of the enterprise architecture, such as software, hardware, proposed security measures, smart lift tickets, webcam systems, and smartphones. 

Part 2: Devil’s Canyon Security Controls 
Using the potential risks for Devil’s Canyon you identified in Part 1, create a matrix to share with the team. In your matrix, you should do the following: 

Briefly describe each of the identified risks/threats. 
Evaluate the security controls that mitigate each of the risks/threats identified.  
Provide a rationale for how each of the controls identified mitigates the risk to an acceptable level. 
Research and describe the security technologies and security design that can be used to mitigate each of the identified information security risks.CMGTCB/582 v1
Devil’s Canyon Transcript: A Role-Playing
Simulation on Designing the Enterprise
Architecture for a Mountain Resort by Patricia
Wallace
In this scenario, you, Learner, will understand how to design an enterprise architecture for a mountain
resort by using the interactive map tools and get a sense of their vision and estimate their expenses.
The scenario will allow you to interact with the decision-makers of the enterprise through the following
tools: Email, Voicemail, Instant Message, Architecture Designer, and Web Meeting.
You will be using various means of interaction in the simulation, which shall be divided into stages as the
interaction proceeds.
Introduction
A team of entrepreneurs is building a mountain resort, called Devil’s Canyon, from the ground up and
they need your help to plan the enterprise architecture. They will need the usual back office applications
to manage finances, human resources, retail management, etc. But they also want Devil’s Canyon to be
the premier, 21st century resort, well equipped with technology to please their increasingly demanding
target market. The Canyon offers skiing and snowboarding in the winter, and swimming, rock-climbing,
white-water rafting, hiking, and fishing in the warmer seasons.
Your job is to get a sense of their vision and how much they can spend and then design the architecture
using the interactive map tools. The kickoff meeting will start soon so you check your messages and get
oriented.
Interaction 1
You have access to the following tools: Email, Voicemail, and Documents.
Email:
You open the email app, and there are three emails—two are replies to the email sent by Ed, one from Se
Jong, and the other reply is from Ariane.
The subject of the email from Ed is “Devil’s Canyon ICT.” In the email, Dan writes the following:
Learner, thanks for coming up here on such short notice. We’ve got the maps all worked out for
the development, but I want to be sure the architecture is right before we start installing any
networks, computers, or software. And the last thing we want to do is string optical fiber, twisted
pair wires or coaxial cables from pole to pole. That would look terrible. All the wiring should be
underground, and we want people to have wireless access from anywhere in the resort—even in
Canyon Lodge at the top of the mountain and on those bunny slopes way over to the east, at
least when the Internet is up. It goes down a lot in the winter because of the storms. It can also
take them a while to get their trucks up the roads to make repairs and bring it back up. The good
Adapted from Introduction to Information Systems (5th ed.). by P. Wallace, 2024, Pearson Education. Copyright 2023 by Pearson
Education. Adapted with permission.
Transcript Devil’s Canyon
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news is that electricity isn’t a problem for us—we have our own generators. We can bring that up
quickly for the resort, so a small data center is feasible.
I put those cost estimates we got for software, servers, data center construction, training,
maintenance, and other things in the Documents folder so you can work out a budget. We need
to be around $750K for total costs for 1 year, which would include all the startup costs. If we can
come in around $1.2 million total for the 3 year cost, that would work well. I know that will make
some tough choices, but you definitely have that much funding to work with.
After reading the mail from Ed, you read the reply made by Se Jong to Ed’s email:
I added a map of the resort to the folder, and I’m working on installing the architect designer
software for Learner. Since we’re starting from scratch on software, we don’t have any legacy
systems to worry about, and can choose whatever operating systems and application software
that will work best for this place. We’ll need all the basics—financials, human resource
management software, inventory, plus software to manage the lodge, rentals, lift tickets, and
such.
Come to think of it, I heard some golf resorts are going with software as a service and cloud
computing. I wonder if Learner thinks that will be the best choice. Then we wouldn’t need a data
center. If we got into infrastructure-as-a-service, we could easily expand storage space without
having to buy bigger and bigger hard drives.
After reading the email from Se Jong, you read the reply made by Ariane to Ed’s email:
Hi Learner and Se Jong. I’ve been thinking about the hardware side. Do you think optical
scanners at the base of the lifts will keep the lines moving faster? I wondered about RFID, too.
What if we put chips in the lift tickets? Could we use that to track charges at the lodge or other
concessions so people wouldn’t need to carry wallets with them? Maybe RFID readers could also
help us know more about where people are on the slopes, especially in bad weather. Might be
costly, though, and that kind of technology will get much cheaper in a couple of years. That’s true
for mobile app development, too. Se Jong’s getting pretty good at that herself.
After reading the emails, you go to the voicemail app.
Voicemail:
There is a voicemail from Ed. In the voicemail, Ed says:
It’s Ed, and I just wanted to welcome you again. There’s just so much to think about for this
resort. We want the customer’s experience to be top notch, with easy access to Wi-Fi for their
laptops and tablets. But what about their smartphones? We have to be sure they work OK up
here. I get a lot of dropped calls now.
After listening to the voicemail, an instant message pops up.
Instant Message:
Se Jong: Learner, I should have the Architect Designer application up and running soon. Sorry for the
delay.
You respond to Se Jong and then read through the documents in the Documents app.
Adapted from Introduction to Information Systems (5th ed.). by P. Wallace, 2024, Pearson Education. Copyright 2023 by Pearson
Education. Adapted with permission.
Transcript Devil’s Canyon
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Documents:
You find two documents titled “Map of the Resort” and “Estimated Costs of Architecture Components.”
The document titled “Map of the Resort” is a map of the resort, shown below:
After going through the map of the resort, you view the document titled “Estimated Costs of Architecture
Components.” Tables in the document with estimated costs for Phases 1–4 are shown below:
Phase 1: Software
Choices
Quantity
One Time
Start up*
Ongoing
Monthly
Expense**
Total 1-Year
Cost
Total 3-Year
Cost
Enterprise System: COTS for
Resort Management (installed on
premises)
1
$150,000
$400
$154,800
$164,400
Enterprise System: Open-Source
Software (installed on premises)
1
$50,000
$4,000
$98,000
$194,000
Enterprise System: Software as a
Service/Cloud computing
1
Not available
$10,000
$120,000
$360,000
Individual Productivity Software:
Microsoft Suite
100
$200
$5
$26,000
$38,000
Individual Productivity Software:
Open Office or Google Docs
100
$85
$30
$44,500
$116,500
Adapted from Introduction to Information Systems (5th ed.). by P. Wallace, 2024, Pearson Education. Copyright 2023 by Pearson
Education. Adapted with permission.
Transcript Devil’s Canyon
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Phase 2: Hardware
Choices
Quantity
One Time
Start up*
Ongoing
Monthly
Expense**
Total 1-Year
Cost
Total 3-Year
Cost
Data Center on premises with
virtualized servers
1
$30,000
$9000
$138,000
$354,000
Microcomputers-Desktops
100
$800
$25
$110,000
$170,000
Microcomputers-Laptops
100
$1,600
$40
$208,000
$304,000
Smartphones
100
$99
$45
$54,099
$162,099
Total 1-Year
Cost
Total 3-Year
Cost
Phase 3: Network and Telecom
Choices
Quantity
One Time
Start up*
Ongoing
Monthly
Expense**
Cabling: All fiber throughout
1
$65,000
$10
$65,120
$65,360
Cabling: Mix of fiber and twisted
pair
1
$15,000
$100
$16,200
$18,600
Cabling: Coaxial cable (mainly for
cable TV)
1
$10,000
$15
$10,180
$10,540
Wi-Fi and Cellular Access: Wi-Fi
Hot Spots
30
$250
$25
$16,500
$34,500
Wi-Fi and Cellular Access: Cell
towers (with pine tree disguise)
3
$20,000
$100
$63,600
$70,800
Voice Calls: PBX (installed on
premises)
1
$48,000
$50
$48,600
$49,800
Voice Calls: Virtual PBX (Voice
over IP, hosted by service)
1
Not available
$300
$3,600
$10,800
Main Internet Connection:
Maximum bandwidth for highest
speeds and traffic
1
$2,000
$250
$5,000
$11,000
Main Internet Connection:
Moderate bandwidth for moderate
speeds and traffic
1
$2,000
$180
$4,160
$8,480
Total 1-Year
Cost
Total 3-Year
Cost
$179,800
$189,400
Phase 4: Special Purpose Systems
Choices
Smart Lift Tickets (with RFID)
Quantity
1
One Time
Start up*
$175,000
Ongoing
Monthly
Expense**
$400
Adapted from Introduction to Information Systems (5th ed.). by P. Wallace, 2024, Pearson Education. Copyright 2023 by Pearson
Education. Adapted with permission.
Transcript Devil’s Canyon
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Page 5 of 14
Choices
One Time
Start up*
Quantity
Ongoing
Monthly
Expense**
Total 1-Year
Cost
Total 3-Year
Cost
Security system (video cameras,
motion sensors)
1
$80,000
$100
$81,200
$83,600
Devil’s Canyon Custom Mobile
Phone App
1
$165,000
$50
$165,600
$166,800
Web Cam System on Slopes with
Large Display in Lodge
1
$25,000
$50
$25,600
$26,800
Notes for Estimated Costs of Architecture Components:


*One time startup costs include expenses such as licenses, purchases, installation, adaptation,
customization, etc.
**Ongoing monthly expense includes maintenance, subscriptions, training, etc.
You close the documents folder, and now the Architecture Designer app is highlighted.
Architecture Designer:
In the Architecture Designer app there is a map of the resort. There are two panes—one pane has the
map of the resort; the second pane has the Enterprise Architecture Design Panel Running Expenses,
where the amount is left blank until the options for Phase 1: Software Choices for the Enterprise Systems
and the Individual Productivity Software are selected. Keep in mind the expenditure that needs to be
made.
Consider the following software choices for Phase 1:
Enterprise Systems
A. COTS for Resort Management (installed on premises)
B. Open-Source Software (installed on premises)
C. Software as a Service/Cloud computing
Individual Productivity Software
A. Microsoft Suite
B. Open Office or Google Docs
You submit your responses for the option that is suitable for Phase 1, and exit the Architecture Designer
app. Now the Email and the Voicemail apps highlighted.
Interaction 2
Email:
You find two emails in the email app, one is from Ed and the other email is from Se Jong replying to Ed’s
email, which has the subject “Phase 1 – Software Selections.”
Adapted from Introduction to Information Systems (5th ed.). by P. Wallace, 2024, Pearson Education. Copyright 2023 by Pearson
Education. Adapted with permission.
Transcript Devil’s Canyon
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Ed’s email says: Learner, this is getting interesting. Are you really saying we don’t need to buy software to
install in our own data center in the basement? I think that sounds terrific. We don’t have much space in
the lodge. But Internet isn’t really very reliable here.
Se Jong’s says: I’ve heard a lot of new developments are going with software as a service. I think a lot of
the security issues are getting resolved, too. One advantage is that we don’t have to worry about
upgrading random access memory or the central processing units of our own servers. The service
handles that.
You exit the email app and access the Voicemail app.
Voicemail:
In the Voicemail app, you see three new voicemails, one from each person—Ariane, Justin and Ed. Their
voice messages are below:
Ariane: Hi, this is Ariane. Just wanted to tell you that I appreciate this recommendation to license the
Microsoft Office suite. I know there are free alternatives, but our staff would squawk about the learning
curve for new application software.
Justin: Justin here. OK, I get it. The good news is that we won’t have to hire a bunch of IT people to staff
the data center 24 by 7. If we go with cloud computing, the service provider will take care of all the system
software and operating system. Internet access could be a real problem, though. Storms bring it down.
Ed: I’m glad you’re not recommending open-source software. It would be really hard for our IT staff to dig
into all that source code. I think one or two know a couple of programming languages, but I think Se Jong
is the only one who has experience with object-oriented programming.
You exit the Voicemail app and go to Se Jong’s instant message.
Se Jong says: Learner, did you get to all your messages yet? I loaded the data for Phase 2 on hardware
architecture, so any time you’re ready, you can go back into the Architecture Designer app.
Architecture Designer:
You can see the map of the resort, with the running expenses based on the choices selected in Phase 1.
A decision needs to be made for the hardware choices of Phase 2. Running expenses will be updated
based on the choices selected.
Consider the hardware choices below, and consider all that could apply:



Data Center on premises with virtualized servers
Microcomputers (Choose 1)
o Desktops
o Laptops
Smartphones
You make the selections for what you think is right in this phase. Keep in mind the budget that has been
allotted by Ed in the beginning.
You exit the Architecture Designer app and now the Voicemail and the Email apps are highlighted.
Adapted from Introduction to Information Systems (5th ed.). by P. Wallace, 2024, Pearson Education. Copyright 2023 by Pearson
Education. Adapted with permission.
Transcript Devil’s Canyon
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Voicemail:
You open the voicemails first, and you can see three new voicemails, one from each person—Justin,
Ariane, and Ed. They provide their feedback and concerns on the choices that have been made for the
hardware. Their voice messages are below:
Justin: Laptops will be a very popular choice. They aren’t quite as powerful as desktops, but thanks to
Moore’s law, their power just seems to double every couple of years or so.
Ariane: Interesting idea to give out smartphones to the staff. They have GPS on them so we’ll know
where everyone is, also, and staff can stay in contact wherever they are, even ski lifts. They also have
Bluetooth so they can use them handsfree with one of those earpieces.
Ed: I know smartphones aren’t cheap, but overall, I think it’s a great incentive for the staff. We’ll give them
unlimited plans so they have as much bandwidth as they need. We can ask them what operating system
they want, but I can see wars breaking out over which one’s the best!
Interaction 3
Email:
In Email app, you find two emails. One is from Ed and the other is from Se Jong.
The email from Ed has the subject “Phase 2 – Hardware Selections,” where he puts forth his views on the
selections that have been made and the concerns that he has regarding the choices. Ed’s email reads:
Learner, that’s good pricing on the laptops, though not sure everyone will need a laptop rather
than a less expensive desktop. They come with good utility software, though—virus scanning,
backup software, things like that. I guess a lot of people will be working from home, so maybe
laptops are best.
The email from Se Jong has the subject “Smartphones,” where she shares her concern of operating
systems for smartphones and source codes. Her email reads:
YES! Smartphones are a great idea, and I’m glad you’re recommending it. I know some people
already have one, but giving everyone the same brand means that we can really get going on the
mobile applications for one operating system. We won’t have to worry about developing several
versions of source code to deal with iPhones, Androids, Symbian, Windows, and all the other
operating systems out there.
Architecture Designer:
In the Architecture Designer app, there is a map of the resort now containing the choices made for both
Phase 1 and Phase 2—Software as a service/cloud computing and Microsoft Office suite for Phase 1;
laptops and smartphones for Phase 2. You are now being asked to make the decision regarding the
network and telecom choices for cabling, Wi-Fi and cellular access, voice calls, main internet connection
of Phase 3. Keep in mind the budget allotted.
Below are the Phase 3 network and telecom choices to consider:
Cabling (Select A or B, C is optional)
A. All fiber throughout
Adapted from Introduction to Information Systems (5th ed.). by P. Wallace, 2024, Pearson Education. Copyright 2023 by Pearson
Education. Adapted with permission.
Transcript Devil’s Canyon
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B. Mix of fiber and twisted pair
C. Coaxial cable (mainly for cable TV)
Wi-Fi and Cellular Access (Select A, B, or both)
A. Wifi Hot Spots
B. Cell towers (with pine tree disguise)
Voice Calls (Select A or B)
A. PBX (installed on premises)
B. Virtual PBX (Voice over IP, hosted by service)
Main Internet Connection (Select A or B)
A. Maximum bandwidth for highest speeds and traffic
B. Moderate bandwidth for moderate speeds and traffic
An instant message has popped up with a message from Ed.
Ed: this is great that we’re moving along on the architecture, Learner. Let’s try out our web meeting
software to discuss what we have so far. I think most of the others are already there.
Web Meeting:
All the members are present in the meeting. In this meeting you all discuss the Wi-Fi, cell towers, landline
voice calls and the bandwidth choices. The meeting ends with the members moving forward to make
choices for Phase 4.
Below is the dialogue that takes place during the meeting and a map of the resort:
Ed: OK, looks like we’re looking at an all optical fiber network here, with no twisted pair.
Justin: Yes, which can support 10 gigabits per second Ethernet networks.
Se Jong: One problem is that we’ll need special interface cards in the computers that have fiber
connectors.
Ed: Is that a problem?
Se Jong: Well, we can do that for staff, but then we can’t expect our guests to have those.
Justin: Suppose we could rent them, but that would be a lot of tech support. We’ll need to offer them Wi-Fi
anyway though, with wireless routers all over the place.
Se Jong: Yes, and Internet Protocol Version 6.0.
Justin: It will work fine for internet access, and be very fast, too. But some guests will really want an
ethernet cable in their cabins.
Ed: What about a coaxial cable?
Se Jong: Well, we may not need it if we can deliver the TV signals using the fiber and ethernet, but
installing coaxial cable now along with the other wiring is cheap and would be very expensive later.
Adapted from Introduction to Information Systems (5th ed.). by P. Wallace, 2024, Pearson Education. Copyright 2023 by Pearson
Education. Adapted with permission.
Transcript Devil’s Canyon
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Page 9 of 14
Justin: Well Learner suggested dropping it.
Ed: OK, let’s drop it. Let’s look at the Wi-Fi now.
Se Jong: Learner, recommended this too. But how can we be sure we’ll have enough access points?
Justin: We can always install more wireless access points if we need them. Not a problem.
Ed: Good, you know people are using their smartphones with Wi-Fi too, so we want them to be able to
connect from anywhere.
Ed: What about the cell towers? It’s annoying that we have to help pay for these. Why don’t the carriers
put them up?
Ariane: Well, they will pay part, and we’ve got to have 3G coverage at least.
Justin: Really 4G now.
Ed: Do we have enough towers do you think?
Justin: Well, I hope so—the engineers thought those placements would give coverage everywhere, even
the valleys.
Ed: Let me show you this design for a cell tower.
Ed shares the map of the resort. Notice that the cell towers are shown close to both ski lifts and an
additional one near the base, which is disguised as a pine tree.
Ed smiles and Ariane claps.
Justin: Ha… the tree looks a little goofy to me, but maybe we can spray it with some fake snow in the
winter.
Se Jong: A jolly snowman cell tower!
Ed: OK, let’s see what we’ve got for landline voice calls.
Ariane: who makes voice calls anymore?
Se Jong: Not me.
Justin: Ha, not me either, I just text.
Adapted from Introduction to Information Systems (5th ed.). by P. Wallace, 2024, Pearson Education. Copyright 2023 by Pearson
Education. Adapted with permission.
Transcript Devil’s Canyon
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Page 10 of 14
Ed: Yeah, well I’m old fashioned! Gotta have voice calling capabilities—voice mail, forwarding.
Se Jong: Well, it makes sense what Learner suggested. As long as we have a data center, we can get
very low per minute charges.
Justin: The smartphones do all that too, though.
Ed: True, true, maybe someday we won’t need a landline phone in the hotel rooms, but now we do. Well,
let’s move on.
Ed: Umm…ok, moderate bandwidth? That’s the less expensive plan with the internet service provider.
Justin: Well, not sure about this, but Learner probably knows best.
Se Jong: Well it could be risky if our customers complain of slow internet, but we could always upgrade to
the maximum bandwidth plan if needed.
Ed: OK, let’s go with the recommendation then. Looks like we’ve made terrific progress on this enterprise
architecture. Just one last group of decisions to make with the special purpose systems.
Se Jong: Well, I can say that I think we should get them all, but let’s wait for Learner to do the
recommendations.
Justin: Works for me…I really want that web cam system on the slopes, though. People will be
blackmailing each other to keep their lousy skiing runs and wipeouts off YouTube.
Ariane: Haha…you got that right.
Ed: But it would be fun for parents to have videos of their kids learning to ski.
Justin: Yeah, and they’d pay a lot for them, too. We could add titles and credits and things, make them
into flashy little movies.
Ed: OK, guys, thanks again for coming to this web meeting on short notice. Let’s break now and get back
to work.
Se Jong: You mean let Learner get back to work. I’m going skiing before those web cams go up.
Justin: Haha…see you guys.
Ariane: Bye, all.
Justin: Thanks again, Learner. Enterprise architecture is like a jigsaw puzzle—all the parts have to fit
together.
You exit the meeting and find the Instant Message app with messages from Ed.
Instant Message:
The message from Ed says that the budget needs to be put forth and he needs recommendations for the
special purpose systems. He reminds you of the budget being $750,000 for the first year and $1.2 million
for total 3 years cost.
Adapted from Introduction to Information Systems (5th ed.). by P. Wallace, 2024, Pearson Education. Copyright 2023 by Pearson
Education. Adapted with permission.
Transcript Devil’s Canyon
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Page 11 of 14
Documents:
In the Documents app, you find a new document titled “Devil’s Canyon Architecture Map (draft).”
The document is the draft model of the resort with the selections that have been made so far for the
resort: cell towers, laptops, smartphones, SaaS, Microsoft Suite, and the network and telecom choices.
Architecture Designer:
In the Architecture Design app, you can see the map of the resort with all the selected options from
Phase 1, 2, and 3. You now need to make a decision regarding the special purpose systems choices of
Phase 4.
Consider the Special Purpose Systems for Phase 4 below, and consider all that could apply:
A.
B.
C.
D.
Smart Lift Tickets (with RFID)
Security system (video cameras, motion sensors)
Devil’s Canyon Custom Mobile Phone App
Web Cam System on Slopes with Large Display in Lodge
Interaction 4
Email:
You find four new emails—two from Ed, one from Se Jong, and the last one from Justin. The emails have
different issues and concerns being discussed like the need for security, smart lift ticket systems with
optical scanners, the budget, and the web cam systems on the slopes.
Ed’s security email reads:
Learner, security probably shouldn’t even have been listed as an option. We obviously have to
have security measures here. It isn’t cheap, but not having it could be much more costly.
Adapted from Introduction to Information Systems (5th ed.). by P. Wallace, 2024, Pearson Education. Copyright 2023 by Pearson
Education. Adapted with permission.
Transcript Devil’s Canyon
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Page 12 of 14
Se Jon’s email about the smart lift tickets reads:
Learner, I guess the smart lift ticket system was still too pricey. Also, some people might raise
ethical concerns since it’s a form of tracking.
If we get it someday, we could also get an optical scanner that just reads the bar code on the
ticket. Hey, just thought of something. If it could do optical character recognition, and the skiers
print their first names on the lift ticket, we could display it on the screen at the lift line. “Welcome,
Basel!”, or “Good luck on your next run, Lucy!” Just a thought.
Ed’s budget email reads:
Learner, I put the final architecture map and the budget in the Documents folder, so we’re ready
to go. It came to $642,279 for all expenses for the first year, and $1,107,639 for three years.
That’s close enough from my perspective.
Thanks again, Learner. This was a rush job, I know, and you had some tough choices to make.
Ed
Justin’s email about web cam system on the slopes reads:
Too bad. This could have been a real money maker, but I know, I know…some people won’t like
it, and would worry about how careful we are about security and privacy. Who knows, Learner?
Maybe some skiers called in sick at work and these videos would prove they just wanted a day
off.
Documents:
In the documents app, you find the two new documents that have been added to the folder. One is titled
“Devil’s Canyon Architecture Map (final) and the other being “Devil’s Canyon Budget.”
“Devil’s Canyon Architecture Map (final)” has the final set up of all the selections that have been made for
the resort, shown below:
Adapted from Introduction to Information Systems (5th ed.). by P. Wallace, 2024, Pearson Education. Copyright 2023 by Pearson
Education. Adapted with permission.
Transcript Devil’s Canyon
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“Devil’s Canyon Budget” has tables with the total cost for designing the enterprise architecture for Devil’s
Canyon for Phases 1–4, shown below:
Phase 1: Software
Choices
Quantity
One Time
Start up*
Ongoing
Monthly
Expense**
Total 1-Year
Cost
Total 3-Year
Cost
Enterprise Systems: Software as
a Service/Cloud computing
1
Not available
$10,000
$120,000
$360,000
Individual Productivity Software:
Microsoft Suite
100
$200
$5
$26,000
$38,000
Ongoing
Monthly
Expense**
Total 1-Year
Cost
Total 3-Year
Cost
Phase 2: Hardware
Choices
Quantity
One Time
Start up*
Microcomputers-Laptops
100
$1,600
$40
$208,000
$304,000
Smartphones
100
$99
$45
$54,099
$162,099
Adapted from Introduction to Information Systems (5th ed.). by P. Wallace, 2024, Pearson Education. Copyright 2023 by Pearson
Education. Adapted with permission.
Transcript Devil’s Canyon
CMGTCB/582 v1
Page 14 of 14
Phase 3: Network and Telecom
Choices
Quantity
One Time
Start up*
Ongoing
Monthly
Expense**
Total 1-Year
Cost
Total 3-Year
Cost
Cabling: All fiber throughout
1
$65,000
$10
$65,120
$65,360
Wi-Fi and Cellular Access: Wi-Fi
Hot Spots
30
$250
$25
$16,500
$34,500
Wi-Fi and Cellular Access: Cell
towers (with pine tree disguise)
3
$20,000
$100
$63,600
$70,800
Voice Calls: Virtual PBX (Voice
over IP, hosted by service)
1
Not available
$300
$3,600
$10,800
Main Internet Connection”
Moderate bandwidth for moderate
speeds and traffic
1
$2,000
$180
$4,160
$8,480
Total 1-Year
Cost
Total 3-Year
Cost
$81,200
$83,600
Phase 4: Special Purpose Systems Choices
Choices
Security system (video cameras,
motion sensors)
Quantity
1
One Time
Start up*
$80,000
Ongoing
Monthly
Expense**
$100
Total cost for Phases 1–4:

1 Year: $642,279

3 Years: $1,107,639
Notes for Devil’s Canyon Budget table:


*One time startup costs include expenses such as licenses, purchases, installation, adaptation,
customization, etc.
**Ongoing monthly expense includes maintenance, subscriptions, training, etc.
End of exercise
Adapted from Introduction to Information Systems (5th ed.). by P. Wallace, 2024, Pearson Education. Copyright 2023 by Pearson
Education. Adapted with permission.

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